FIRE OF THE RAGING DRAGON – Don Brown (2012)

0310330157_lFire of the Raging Dragon by Don Brown is a military thriller that sends readers into a fictional battle that escalates between the United States and China.  Tang Qhichen, the Chinese president sends his Navy to strike an island in the South China sea – controlled by Taiwan.  At the center of the story, is a Chinese ship that is overtaken by the Taiwanese military which leads to the discovery of a serious crime (which will not be revealed in this review).  The Taiwanese military requests American assistance at which point, the crime originally uncovered was more serious than  suspected.  American forces seize the ship in order to preserve the evidence of a crime with the hopes that the perpetrators would be brought to justice.

The Chinese counterattack by seizing a US Navy warship, a submarine that does not have sufficient weapons to defend itself.  The plot thickens when the US President discovers that his daughter is aboard the USS Emory S. Land, the warship that is currently under Chinese control.

One of the central questions of the book concerns the US President: How will he respond to the Chinese?  Will he capitulate since his daughter is aboard the USS Emory – 0r will his leadership reflect one who is ruled by principle instead of pragmatism.

Fire of the Raging Dragon is a good book – filled with plenty of action and warfare.   But the most fascinating component involves the ethical decisions that the president faces.  The book also reminds readers of the awkward political position of the United States in her relationship with the Chinese government, especially in light of the trillions of dollars of debt.  Perhaps even a fictional account like Fire of the Raging Dragon would remind the federal government to review and revise policies in our relations with China.

I received this book free from the publisher through the BookSneeze®.com  book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review.

3 stars

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